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Canada parliament sits after attacks: The parliament in Ottawa returns to work the day after a gunman rampaged through its corridors before being shot dead by the sergeant-at-arms.
Nato jets 'intercept Russian plane': Nato warplanes have intercepted a Russian spy plane over the Baltic Sea, the alliance says, amid heightened tensions between the West and Russia.
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Injured Schumacher makes 'progress': A doctor who treated Michael Schumacher for nearly six months after his brain injury in a skiing accident says the F1 champion has made "some progress".

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Ottawa shooting: Man arrested near war memorial as Stephen Harper lays wreath: Ottawa Parliament Shooting Arrest War Memorial

Ottawa police have arrested a man who crossed police tape near the National War Memorial while Prime Minister Stephen Harper was preparing to lay a wreath this morning in honour of the soldier killed in yesterday's shootings.


15 minutes of terror in the Conservative caucus room: Sgt.-at-Arms Kevin Vickers

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Parliament returns to new 'normal' after gunman's attack: Ottawa shooting

MPs will be sitting in the House of Commons as usual today following yesterday's deadly shooting in the capital, but security measures will likely be stepped up and the Hill will be closed to visitors.



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Dot Earth Blog: ‘Extreme Whether’ Explores the Climate Fight as a Family Feud: A new play tries to engage audiences on global warming through a family feud over fossil fuels, dying frogs and melting ice





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Ebola Guidelines for Doctors’ Offices Are Called Vague and Vary by Region: Often local officials and medical associations are left to develop their own policies on how doctors’ offices, walk-in clinics and blood-testing centers should handle possible Ebola cases





Scientists Consider Repurposing Robots for Ebola: A problem is that mobile robots now lack the human levels of dexterity required in medicine and health care





Carolyn Rovee-Collier, Who Said Babies Have Clear Memories, Is Dead at 72: Dr. Rovee-Collier, a developmental psychologist at Rutgers University, showed in a series of papers in the early 1980s that babies remembered plenty







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quantumaniac:

Nobel Prize in Chemistry for Improving Microscopy

Eric BetzigStefan W. Helland William E. Moerner have been awarded the 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for enabling microscopes to gaze at smaller structures than anyone thought possible.  Scientists believed that microscopy would never obtain a better resolution than half the wavelength of light for a long time, many even started to consider it a physical limit after microscopist Ernst Abbe declared it so in 1873. Nonetheless, these three scientists circumvented that supposed limit - and changed the world of microscopy.

Using this new micro-microscopy, what has become known as nanoscopy, scientists can now visualize incredibly small features:

They can see how molecules create synapses between nerve cells in the brain; they can track proteins involved in Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and Huntington’s diseases as they aggregate; they follow individual proteins in fertilized eggs as these divide into embryos.

From the Nobel Prize committee

Two separate principles are rewarded. One enables the method stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy, developed by Stefan Hell in 2000. Two laser beams are utilized; one stimulates fluorescent molecules to glow, another cancels out all fluorescence except for that in a nanometre-sized volume. Scanning over the sample, nanometre for nanometre, yields an image with a resolution better than Abbe’s stipulated limit.

Eric Betzig and William Moerner, working separately, laid the foundation for the second method, single-molecule microscopy. The method relies upon the possibility to turn the fluorescence of individual molecules on and off. Scientists image the same area multiple times, letting just a few interspersed molecules glow each time. Superimposing these images yields a dense super-image resolved at the nanolevel. In 2006 Eric Betzig utilized this method for the first time.

Today, nanoscopy is used world-wide and new knowledge of greatest benefit to mankind is produced on a daily basis.

Read the full press release here

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More physics here than in this years physics Nobel



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