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Ebola-hit nations get key supplies: Vital supplies to tackle Ebola are beginning to arrive in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone - the worst-hit countries, Ghana's president says.
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Canada hit-and-run man 'radicalised': A man who struck two Canadian soldiers with his car before he was shot dead by police had been "radicalised", Canada's PM says.

CBC
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A driver who injured two soldiers and was later fatally shot by police in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Que., was known to federal authorities as someone who had been "radicalized," according to the RCMP and the Prime Minister's Office.


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Prime minister's staffer recalls receiving package containing Jun Lin's foot: Magnotta Jury Selection Montreal Murder charge

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Well: Ask Well: Do Mosquitoes Spread Ebola?: Mosquitoes spread a number of life-threatening illnesses, but can they spread Ebola? Thankfully, the answer is no, and the reason has to do wtih the unusual feeding and egg-laying cycle of female mosquitoes





Raw Data: Seeking Stars, Finding Creationism: Astronomy is still fending off charges of blasphemy. These days the opposition comes not from the Vatican, but from a people with very different religious beliefs





Well: For Children With Autism, Opening a Door to Dental Care: More dentists are learning to meet the delicate challenge of caring for children with autism Reactions: Patient Records, O.C.D. Burdens, Teenagers Interrogated: Letters to the editor and online comments







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quantumaniac:

Nobel Prize in Chemistry for Improving Microscopy

Eric BetzigStefan W. Helland William E. Moerner have been awarded the 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for enabling microscopes to gaze at smaller structures than anyone thought possible.  Scientists believed that microscopy would never obtain a better resolution than half the wavelength of light for a long time, many even started to consider it a physical limit after microscopist Ernst Abbe declared it so in 1873. Nonetheless, these three scientists circumvented that supposed limit - and changed the world of microscopy.

Using this new micro-microscopy, what has become known as nanoscopy, scientists can now visualize incredibly small features:

They can see how molecules create synapses between nerve cells in the brain; they can track proteins involved in Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and Huntington’s diseases as they aggregate; they follow individual proteins in fertilized eggs as these divide into embryos.

From the Nobel Prize committee

Two separate principles are rewarded. One enables the method stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy, developed by Stefan Hell in 2000. Two laser beams are utilized; one stimulates fluorescent molecules to glow, another cancels out all fluorescence except for that in a nanometre-sized volume. Scanning over the sample, nanometre for nanometre, yields an image with a resolution better than Abbe’s stipulated limit.

Eric Betzig and William Moerner, working separately, laid the foundation for the second method, single-molecule microscopy. The method relies upon the possibility to turn the fluorescence of individual molecules on and off. Scientists image the same area multiple times, letting just a few interspersed molecules glow each time. Superimposing these images yields a dense super-image resolved at the nanolevel. In 2006 Eric Betzig utilized this method for the first time.

Today, nanoscopy is used world-wide and new knowledge of greatest benefit to mankind is produced on a daily basis.

Read the full press release here

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More physics here than in this years physics Nobel



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